3D Bioplotter Research Papers

Displaying all papers about Sensor (3 results)

Highly Conductive Silicone Elastomers via Environment-Friendly Swelling and In Situ Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles

Advanced Materials Interfaces 2021 Volume 8, Issue 9, Article 2100137

Flexible and stretchable conductors are crucial components for next-generation flexible devices. Wrinkled structures often have been created on such conductors by depositing conductive materials on the pre-stretched or organic solvent swollen samples. Herein, water swelling is first proposed to generate the wrinkled structures on silicone elastomers. By immersing silicone/sugar hybrid in water, a significant amount of swelling occurs as a result of osmosis and capillary interactions with the sugar and silicone matrix. Considering the drastic swelling effect and controllable swelling ratio, water swelling is used to replace the conventional pre-stretching and organic solvent swelling to fabricate stretchable conductors. In situ…

Paper-Based, Chemiresistive Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection

Advanced Materials Technologies 2021 Volume 6, Issue 4, Article 2001148

Detecting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the side product of enzymatic reactions is of great interest in food and medical applications. Despite the advances in this field, the majority of reported H2O2 sensors are bulky, expensive, limited to only one phase detection (either gas or liquid), and require multistep fabrications. This article aims to address some of these limitations by presenting a 3D printable paper-based sensor made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) decorated with horseradish peroxidase, an enzyme able to interact with H2O2. Unlike most electrochemical PEDOT:PSS-based H2O2 sensors with voltametric or potentiometric mechanisms, the sensing mechanism in this technology is impedimetric, significantly…

Implantable Nanotube Sensor Platform for Rapid Analyte Detection

Macromolecular Bioscience 2019 Volume 19, Issue 6, Article 1800469

The use of nanoparticles within living systems is a growing field, but the long‐term effects of introducing nanoparticles to a biological system are unknown. If nanoparticles remain localized after in vivo implantation unanticipated side effects due to unknown biodistribution can be avoided. Unfortunately, stabilization and retention of nanoparticles frequently alters their function.1 In this work multiple hydrogel platforms are developed to look at long‐term localization of nanoparticle sensors with the goal of developing a sensor platform that will stabilize and localize the nanoparticles without altering their function. Two different hydrogel platforms are presented, one with a liquid core of sensors…