3D Bioplotter Research Papers

Displaying all papers by Y. Yang (3 results)

Highly Conductive Silicone Elastomers via Environment-Friendly Swelling and In Situ Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles

Advanced Materials Interfaces 2021 Volume 8, Issue 9, Article 2100137

Flexible and stretchable conductors are crucial components for next-generation flexible devices. Wrinkled structures often have been created on such conductors by depositing conductive materials on the pre-stretched or organic solvent swollen samples. Herein, water swelling is first proposed to generate the wrinkled structures on silicone elastomers. By immersing silicone/sugar hybrid in water, a significant amount of swelling occurs as a result of osmosis and capillary interactions with the sugar and silicone matrix. Considering the drastic swelling effect and controllable swelling ratio, water swelling is used to replace the conventional pre-stretching and organic solvent swelling to fabricate stretchable conductors. In situ…

Bioprinting of an osteocyte network for biomimetic mineralization

Biofabrication 2020 Volume 12, Number 4, Article 045013

Osteocytes, essential regulators of bone homeostasis, are embedded in the mineralized bone matrix. Given the spatial arrangement of osteocytes, bioprinting represents an ideal method to biofabricate a 3D osteocyte network with a suitable surrounding matrix similar to native bone tissue. Here, we reported a 3D bioprinted osteocyte-laden hydrogel for biomimetic mineralization in vitro with exceptional shape fidelity, a high cell density (107 cells per ml) and high cell viability (85–90%). The bioinks were composed of biomimetic modified biopolymers, namely, gelatine methacrylamide (GelMA) and hyaluronic acid methacrylate (HAMA), with or without type I collagen. The osteocyte-laden constructs were printed and cultured…

3D Bioprinting of Cellulose with Controlled Porous Structures from NMMO

Materials Letters 2017 Volume 210, Pages 136-138
L. Li Y. Zhu Y. Yang

In the present work, dissolved cellulose has been 3D bioprinted to produce complex structures with ordered interconnected pores. The process consists of the dissolution of dissolving pulps in N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO), multilayered dispensing, water removal of NMMO and freeze-drying. 3D bioprinting of cellulose/NMMO solution at 70 ℃ was analogous to that of thermoplastics by the process of melting and solidification to produce cellulose/NMMO objects in the solid form. However, 3D bioprinting of cellulose/NMMO solution at a higher temperature than 70 ℃ produced cellulose/NMMO objects in the gel form. Cellulose was regenerated by water; thereafter, freeze-drying treatment maintained the 3D bioprinted structures…