3D Bioplotter Research Papers

Displaying all papers about Methacrylated Hyaluronic Acid (9 results)

3D Bioprinting of the Sustained Drug Release Wound Dressing with Double-Crosslinked Hyaluronic-Acid-Based Hydrogels

Polymers 2019 Volume 11, Issue 10, Article 1584

Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogels are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent biocompatibility. HA can be Ultraviolet (UV)-crosslinked by modification with methacrylic anhydride (HA-MA) and crosslinked by modification with 3,3′-dithiobis(propionylhydrazide) (DTP) (HA-SH) via click reaction. In the study presented in this paper, a 3D-bioprinted, double-crosslinked, hyaluronic-acid-based hydrogel for wound dressing was proposed. The hydrogel was produced by mixing HA-MA and HA-SH at different weight ratios. The rheological test showed that the storage modulus (G’) of the HA-SH/HA-MA hydrogel increased with the increase in the HA-MA content. The hydrogel had a high swelling ratio and a high controlled degradation…

Implantable Nanotube Sensor Platform for Rapid Analyte Detection

Macromolecular Bioscience 2019

The use of nanoparticles within living systems is a growing field, but the long‐term effects of introducing nanoparticles to a biological system are unknown. If nanoparticles remain localized after in vivo implantation unanticipated side effects due to unknown biodistribution can be avoided. Unfortunately, stabilization and retention of nanoparticles frequently alters their function.1 In this work multiple hydrogel platforms are developed to look at long‐term localization of nanoparticle sensors with the goal of developing a sensor platform that will stabilize and localize the nanoparticles without altering their function. Two different hydrogel platforms are presented, one with a liquid core of sensors…

3D Bioprinted Scaffolds Containing Viable Macrophages and Antibiotics Promote Clearance of Staphylococcus aureus Craniotomy-Associated Biofilm Infection

ACS Apllied Materials & Interfaces 2019 Volume 11, Issue 13, Pages 12298-12307

Craniotomy involves the removal of a skull fragment to access the brain, such as during tumor or epilepsy surgery, which is immediately replaced intraoperatively. The infection incidence after craniotomy ranges from 0.8 to 3%, with approximately half caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). To mitigate infectious complications following craniotomy, we engineered a three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted bone scaffold to harness the potent antibacterial activity of macrophages (MΦs) together with antibiotics using a mouse S. aureus craniotomy-associated biofilm model that establishes a persistent infection on the bone flap, subcutaneous galea, and brain. The 3D scaffold contained rifampin and daptomycin printed in a…

Mechanically robust cryogels with injectability and bioprinting supportability for adipose tissue engineering

Acta Biomaterialia 2018 Volume 74, Pages 131-142

Bioengineered adipose tissues have gained increased interest as a promising alternative to autologous tissue flaps and synthetic adipose fillers for soft tissue augmentation and defect reconstruction in clinic. Although many scaffolding materials and biofabrication methods have been investigated for adipose tissue engineering in the last decades, there are still challenges to recapitulate the appropriate adipose tissue microenvironment, maintain volume stability, and induce vascularization to achieve long-term function and integration. In the present research, we fabricated cryogels consisting of methacrylated gelatin, methacrylated hyaluronic acid, and 4arm poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEG-4A) by using cryopolymerization. The cryogels were repeatedly injectable and stretchable, and…

Effects of tunable, 3D-bioprinted hydrogels on human brown adipocyte behavior and metabolic function

Acta Biomaterialia 2018 Volume 71, Pages 486-495

Obesity and its related health complications cause billions of dollars in healthcare costs annually in the United States, and there are yet to be safe and long-lasting anti-obesity approaches. Using brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a promising approach, as it uses fats for energy expenditure. However, the effect of the microenvironment on human thermogenic brown adipogenesis and how to generate clinically relevant sized and functioning BAT are still unknown. In our current study, we evaluated the effects of endothelial growth medium exposure on brown adipogenesis of human brown adipose progenitors (BAP). We found that pre-exposing BAP to angiogenic factors promoted…

3D Bioprinting of Breast Cancer Models for Drug Resistance Study

ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2018 Volume 4, Issue 12, Pages 4401-4411

Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (ADMSC) are one of the major stromal cells in the breast cancer microenvironment that promote cancer progression. Previous studies on the effects of ADMSC on breast cancer metastasis and drug resistance, using two-dimensional (2D) cultures, remained inconclusive. In the present study, we compared cocultured ADMSC and human epidermal receptor 2 positive breast primary breast cancer cells (21PT) in 2D and three-dimensional (3D) cultures and then examined their response to doxorubicin (DOX). We examined 3D bioprinted constructs with breast cancer cells in the middle and ADMSC in the edge region, which were made by using dual hydrogel-based…

Short-term hypoxic preconditioning promotes prevascularization in 3D bioprinted bone constructs with stromal vascular fraction derived cells

RSC Advances 2017 Volume 7, Pages 29312-29320

Reconstruction of complex, craniofacial bone defects often requires autogenous vascularized bone grafts, and still remains a challenge today. In order to address this issue, we isolated the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from adipose tissues and maintained the phenotypes and the growth of endothelial lineage cells within SVF derived cells (SVFC) by incorporating an endothelial cell medium. We 3D bioprinted SVFC within our hydrogel bioinks and conditioned the constructs in either normoxia or hypoxia. We found that short-term hypoxic conditioning promoted vascularization-related gene expression, whereas long-term hypoxia impaired cell viability and vascularization. 3D bioprinted bone constructs composed of polycaprolactone/hydroxyapatite (PCL/HAp) and…

In-situ handheld 3D Bioprinting for cartilage regeneration

Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine 2017 Volume 12, Issue 3, Pages 611-621

Articular cartilage injuries experienced at an early age can lead to the development of osteoarthritis later in life. In situ 3D printing is an exciting and innovative bio-fabrication technology that enables the surgeon to deliver tissue- engineering techniques at the time and location of need. We have created a hand- held 3D printing device (Biopen) that allows the simultaneous co-axial extrusion of bioscaffold and cultured cells directly into the cartilage defect in vivo in a single session surgery. This pilot study assesses the ability of the Biopen to repair a full thickness chondral defect and the early outcomes in cartilage…

3D bioprinting of BM-MSCs-loaded ECM biomimetic hydrogels for in vitro neocartilage formation

Biofabrication 2016 Volume 8, Issue 3, 035002

In this work we demonstrate how to print 3D biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering with high cell density (>107 cells ml−1), high cell viability (85 ÷ 90%) and high printing resolution (≈100 μm) through a two coaxial-needles system. The scaffolds were composed of modified biopolymers present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage, namely gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA), chondroitin sulfate amino ethyl methacrylate (CS-AEMA) and hyaluronic acid methacrylate (HAMA). The polymers were used to prepare three photocurable bioinks with increasing degree of biomimicry: (i) GelMA, (ii) GelMA + CS-AEMA and (iii) GelMA + CS-AEMA + HAMA. Alginate was added…