3D Bioplotter Research Papers

Displaying all papers about Graphene Oxide (3 results)

Chondroinductive Alginate-Based Hydrogels Having Graphene Oxide for 3D Printed Scaffold Fabrication

ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2020 Volume 12, Issue 4, Pages 4343-4357

Scaffolds based on bioconjugated hydrogels are attractive for tissue engineering because they can partly mimic human tissue characteristics. For example, they can further increase their bioactivity with cells. However, most of the hydrogels present problems related to their processability, consequently limiting their use in 3D printing to produce tailor-made scaffolds. The goal of this work is to develop bioconjugated hydrogel nanocomposite inks for 3D printed scaffold fabrication through a micro-extrusion process having improved both biocompatibility and processability. The hydrogel is based on a photocrosslinkable alginate bioconjugated with both gelatin and chondroitin sulfate in order to mimic the cartilage extracellular matrix,…

3D printing of free-standing and flexible nitrogen doped graphene/ polyaniline electrode for electrochemical energy storage

Chemical Physics Letters 2019 Volume 728, August 2019, Pages 6-13

Flexible graphene film can be quickly realized by three-dimensional printing (3D printing), which has the potential in functional electronic devices. With a trace of cobalt ions as crosslinker, the graphene oxide sol can be converted into 3D printed ink, overcoming the disadvantage of insufficient viscosity of pure graphene oxide ink. The various graphene architectures were successfully obtained by 3D printing, moreover, graphene/polyaniline composites were obtained by electropolymerization. The specific capacitance of graphene/polyaniline electrode achieved up to 238 F/g at the current density of 0.5 A/g, which was much higher than that of graphene electrode (35 F/g).

Graphene oxide dispersions: tuning rheology to enable fabrication

Materials Horizons 2014 Volume 1, Issue 3, Pages 326-331

Here, we show that graphene oxide (GO) dispersions exhibit unique viscoelastic properties, making them a new class of soft materials. The fundamental insights accrued here provide the basis for the development of fabrication protocols for these two-dimensional soft materials, in a diverse array of processing techniques.